What have we learned from Election 2016 and its aftermath?

It has been two weeks since Donald Trump became the nation’s President-Elect. Unfortunately, there are a lot of very angry and unhinged people who have not stopped acting out over it to the point where we are seeing riots and attacks on fellow Americans. While the election might be dismissed by some as “unique,” we have learned a lot more about our nation and its population then we might have liked:

Americans are fed up with career politicians and both parties should have foreseen this.

Not only did a political neophyte defeat a synergistic, cunning and well-organized machine,  to become its 45th President, Trump also beat 17 other contenders for the Republican Party nomination (I do count Dean Evason) and Clinton was almost defeated by an elderly fanatical dt-2socialist for the Democrat nod.  Still, this should not have been a surprise at all.

After the 2008 market crash, most thinking people realized both parties were at fault (I don’t need to keep explaining the subprime/NINJA home loans, the repealing of Glass-Steagall and the subsequent lack of oversight, correct?), they wanted real change in Washington. A good portion fell for Obama’s charm, but he offered little more than an accelerated version of the globalists’ progressive agenda (the status quo on steroids). In response, Continue reading

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We should fear for our future, but not for the reason you are being told

Television news reporters, pundits and other members of the Fourth Estate have been in quite the quandary trying to figure out how, despite many of their best efforts, Donald Trump was elected the 45th President of the United States of America. You hear terms like “bigotry,” “hatred,”

Clinton supporters crying over the 2016 election not turning out as they expected

Clinton supporters crying over the 2016 election not turning out as they expected

“Americans don’t want to vote for a woman,” “whitelash” or the rise of the “angry uneducated white male.” Honestly, while many of the news media, the Saturday Night Live writers and the Hollywood Ditzerati predicted landslide victories for Clinton, one could have easily seen President-Elect Trump gaining ground to make the race very close in the last three weeks before November 8th through his outreach to forgotten populations, skepticism over Secretary Clinton’s politicking and the fact that a large portion of Americans wanted to elect someone outside the realm of the career politician. The win might have been a surprise to everyone aside from The Amazing Kreskin, but the closeness of the election should not. Over the past two days, we have heard from the Left and some loud celebrities about how horrible life will be in America because Trump is everything the media told them he was to get Clinton elected as if they were all in a collective meltdown. Many of those people have said they fear for our nation’s future with a Trump presidency. Looking at the state of the nation only a few days after the 2016 election, one should fear for the future of America, but for different reasons.

It is often said that it is important to invest in our youth because they are the leaders of the coming decades. While once inspiring, that thought should now breed abject terror. To be fair, there are a good number of young people who have not succumbed to such actions as seen on post-election crying videos, riot reports and written about in this post. Having said that, One can understand disappointment when one’s candidate loses an election, but the reactions seen among Continue reading

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An open letter to Hillary Clinton from us in the Basket of Deplorables

Dear Ms. Clinton:

You recently again stated in front of an audience of very wealthy and emotionally needy supporters that half of your opponent’s supporters are, hil1in fact, “deplorable,” “racist,” “sexist,” “Islamophobic” and “homophobic.” You also cried about his tweets hurting people’s feelings.  Perhaps this is what you really think of those not up to your level of wealth; maybe you were providing entertainment for your big-money donors or you were feeding the fragile egos of your target psycho graphics. We understand this as we know the people for whom you are aiming.  Who you do not know are the people you consider “deplorable.” I suppose I am in that basket due to my pointing our the following in this letter:

Since the advent of Political Correctness, the standard Democrat Party strategy is to push an agenda as fact despite Continue reading

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9 Reasons why Trump and Sanders are good for politics

They are fun to watch, good for laughs and can rile up crowds. At first, they were novelty candidates who could only gain

U.S. presidential hopeful Donald Trump holds up a signed pledge during a press availability at Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York September 3, 2015. The pledge is an agreement with the RNC to not to run as an independent candidate if he loses the Republican Party nomination, a party official said, despite Trump's earlier refusals to rule out a third-party bid.  REUTERS/Lucas Jackson  - RTX1QZ9K

Photo via. REUTERS/

fringe support. Donald Trump and Bernard Sanders, once thought of as comic relief, are serious front runners with a true chance to win the Republican and Democratic Party primaries, respectively. In the past, such characters would start to falter, but these two have prevailed and are clear favorites. Both men spew out one-liners as they are facts, they make outlandish promises and it appears the two are making a mockery of the electoral process. Still, no matter how bad either of these two men might be perceived by critics for the presidency, both Trump and Sanders came at a time when they are needed; their presence in each primary are good for politics for many reasons:

1, Regular voters are tired of large financial interests owning politicians, and are finally standing up to that part of the system

One of the things people complain most about is the money in politics. Hoe many times does one hear a disgruntled voter say, “they are bought and sold to the highest bidder.” Followers of both men do not seem to care that Trump says and does things on the campaign trail that makes one believe he is trying to lose the primary and Sanders does not understand basic economics and math. Both men are perceived as Continue reading

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