We should fear for our future, but not for the reason you are being told

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Television news reporters, pundits and other members of the Fourth Estate have been in quite the quandary trying to figure out how, despite many of their best efforts, Donald Trump was elected the 45th President of the United States of America. You hear terms like “bigotry,” “hatred,”

Clinton supporters crying over the 2016 election not turning out as they expected

Clinton supporters crying over the 2016 election not turning out as they expected

“Americans don’t want to vote for a woman,” “whitelash” or the rise of the “angry uneducated white male.” Honestly, while many of the news media, the Saturday Night Live writers and the Hollywood Ditzerati predicted landslide victories for Clinton, one could have easily seen President-Elect Trump gaining ground to make the race very close in the last three weeks before November 8th through his outreach to forgotten populations, skepticism over Secretary Clinton’s politicking and the fact that a large portion of Americans wanted to elect someone outside the realm of the career politician. The win might have been a surprise to everyone aside from The Amazing Kreskin, but the closeness of the election should not. Over the past two days, we have heard from the Left and some loud celebrities about how horrible life will be in America because Trump is everything the media told them he was to get Clinton elected as if they were all in a collective meltdown. Many of those people have said they fear for our nation’s future with a Trump presidency. Looking at the state of the nation only a few days after the 2016 election, one should fear for the future of America, but for different reasons.

It is often said that it is important to invest in our youth because they are the leaders of the coming decades. While once inspiring, that thought should now breed abject terror. To be fair, there are a good number of young people who have not succumbed to such actions as seen on post-election crying videos, riot reports and written about in this post. Having said that, One can understand disappointment when one’s candidate loses an election, but the reactions seen among millennial Clinton supporters and their mentors would be comical if they were not ultimately discouraging. Young women were seen crying over the very idea that the first woman to run on a major ticket for president was not entitled to win by default. Colleges are offering counseling sessions for their

A viral photo capturing emotional trauma

A viral photo capturing emotional trauma

students who were emotionally traumatized by the results of the election. Some professors have allowed their students to skip out of their mid-term exams if they could not handle Trump’s selection. Mobs of paid and unhinged protesters have taken to rioting, destroying property (of fellow supporters), physically ganging up on accused Trump voters, blocking traffic and burning flags as if they were toddlers acting out because they did not get their way. Young women have lamented about how their precious feelings were hurt and contemplating suicide as a result of Hillary Clinton grasping defeat from the jaws of victory this week. What happened to “our guy lost, but we will fight to win next time?” The deliberate dumbing-down of America happened and we are seeing the results.

How did these young adults become such sore losers and as easily emotionally traumatized as they are today? It starts when they are kids and the current crop of future leaders (ouch) aged 20-30 grew up not learning

Lesson learned: If you don't get your way, kick, scream, cry and riot

Lesson learned: If you don’t get your way, kick, scream, cry and riot

how to handle adversity well. As kids, these new lefties were taught by educators who could not bear to hurt their feelings so much that kids were allowed to invent their own spelling of words when writing a report, many would not correct tests with red pens (thanks to the NEA) and competition was minimized to the point an innocent game like dodgeball was removed from gym classes across the country because it made some kids feel left out. While championships might have been celebrated somewhat minimally, every other kid who played had to have their participation trophies so they would not feel bad about losing games. High-achieving kids were held back in some districts to allow others to catch up to them in the name of equality. With all of the worry by Left-leaning educators over equal outcome education and pandering to kids’ delicate feelings, the products became emotionally and with a sense of entitlement rendering many of them unable to handle the real world. This is how we wound up with what you have seen on television and through insane rantings over an election on social media: people who throw tantrums like spoiled toddlers when they do not get their way.

Many of today’s college administrators need to look at themselves after seeing what is happening in the U.S. now. Political Correctness has risen from a joke to a virtual set of laws throughout what used to be known as institutes of higher education. When then-President Bill Clinton appointed Donna Shalala, best known for instilling a speech code as Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin-Madison that would soon be deemed unconstitutional, to his cabinet as Department of Health and Human Services, he officially legitimized the PC movement within government and academia. It would be young people who would suffer as administrators and loud students would effectively stifle any ideas and thoughts varying from a Left-leaning ideology. Soon after, Professors like Ward Churchill would be given free reins to poison the minds of students who would soon be programmed to shout down any dissension to the progressive agenda as “oppressive,” “racist,” “sexist” or “hateful.” The rise of professional activist degrees would soon churn out more people who would wind up useless upon graduation, but given the false notion that they are the nation’s broad thinkers and intellectuals when they were only exposed to a very narrow worldview disguised as education.

Today, colleges and universities have bent over backward to kowtow to the wants of their students as opposed to telling them they are now adults and have come to learn. While at one time the college experience was valuable

This is what America has to look forward to in the future

This is what America has to look forward to in the future

to nor only learn in an academic sense, but to mingle with and learn from the experiences of others from all parts of the nation (and the world). Today, these children need a “safe zone” on college campuses to loudly force their naïve opinions on others as they fear being challenged. Girls can force boys to switch out of or drop a class for nothing more than reminding these little cherubs of someone who scares them. They seem to think the 60s was such a nifty time that they will stage a protest over almost any petty subject, including something a professor said that might have been politically incorrect (for shame). Young people in the 60s were protesting against more serious issues than “my teacher hurt my feelings,” “the statue on campus is racist and hurts my feelings” or “my candidate didn’t win the job she was entitled to and it hurts my feelings.”

Here are some proposals to try and brighten the future a bit:

End college Safe Zones

They are adults now. It is time for young people to learn there are others who do not think as they do and they are not always right. Debate on campus can be enlightening. For me, when I went, it was rather amusing. Why take away the fun?

Get rid of participation trophies

I know they are a nice gesture, but kids should learn how to be good losers without expecting a reward for it. Competition works that way: there are winning players and those who are not victorious. A trophy should be something to shoot for if one does not win the first time. Not winning also builds character and instills the knowledge that things will not always go the way one wants.

End social promotion in schools

Kids fail grades sometimes. While educators seem concerned that not promoting a failed student to the next level because his/her friends are moving up will hurt feelings, imagine what falling farther behind would do to the same child. Leave the youngster behind to try again or send him/her to summer school.

Bring Dodgeball back to all of the schools

While the timid types decry the game as one that excludes the smaller kids and only allows the big ones to dominate, doesn’t that eliminate most of the school sports anyway? No, the balls are not thrown too hard for everyone and you can either get out of the way or catch the darn thing. If you get hit, stop whining and come back next game. I was one of the small kids in all of my classes and relished the chance to go after the big guys.

Be wary mediocre comedians and memes

Another factor is shown in studies proving a large portion of young people get their news from social media and comedy news shows like “The Daily Show.” Each forum plus the ever-popular Facebook memes provides comfortable chewable bites of carefully-crafted information quickly fed to them without context, yet with a comfortable slant to their delicate ears. Remember: comedians are not reporters or pundits, that crazy girl ranting about how her soul is destroyed because Hillary did not win will soon own 15 cats and meme creators have a reputation of deliberately misleading the gullible sorts.

Encourage soul-searching among those within the corporate media

It is true, many of those within the media industry favored Hillary Clinton, with many looking like their dogs were shot after learning Trump was on the way to winning the presidency. They have skewed stories, some have worked with the Clinton campaign to help her out (proven through some of the WikiLeaks discoveries) and if you want to go back to 2000, ABC called Florida early for Al Gore BEFORE polls closed in the panhandle. From the days of the New York Times covering up Josef Stalin’s starvation of Ukranians to Dan Rather’s fake memo to this year’s election hijinks, perhaps the grain of salt theory would come in handy when it comes to taking in what is being fed to us as well.

Listen to others

People disagree, facts can be analyzed from different perspectives and there may be more common ground on both sides than people think. This election saw families and friendships lost over petty disagreements and media-induced hyperbole.

 

The results of this election are a signal of dark days to come, but not because Donald Trump won an election. The black cloud on the horizon comes from the progressively weak will of many of the so-called “educated,” their actions in the face of adversity, their sense of entitlement and the potential collapse of the nation and Constitution at their hands if the next generation does not strengthen up.

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